Weddings and Kids

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All Kids Left Behind?

If you watched our video blog on making your wedding and reception a “kid-free” event, you already know our thoughts on the issue. We see it too often. You spend months planning. You invest a big chunk of change.  The video crew zooms in on the couple saying their vows when a child starts screeching over a toy that’s been taken away from them. Then later, kids race through the reception venue and topple everything in their pathway. Or it’s time for the father-daughter dance, but a little one wants to dance with “grandpa.” The scene can turn ugly fast. You get the idea!

Breaking the News

So, let’s say you’ve thought it through and have decided your wedding and reception should be for adults only. How do you tactfully let people know your decision? And are there things you can do to soften the blow?

We reviewed what wedding etiquette experts have to say. Everyone agreed that it’s best to put the information on the invitation or RSVP card or both. Straight to the point statements leave no doubt.

  • Adults only
  • Please, no children
  • Please respect our wishes for a child free reception (or wedding)
  • Invitation is for adults only.

If those are too harsh, you can soften the blow a bit. After all, it could be a budget issue or a lack of space. Try something like this.

  • Kids like to run and play. But for us, this is an adults only day.
  • Because we want to relax at the end of the day, please find a sitter for the kids and join us for a break.
  • Space will be limited so please, no children.

If children are welcome at the wedding, but not the reception, you can adjust the information.

  • Children are invited to the wedding, but the reception is for adults only
  • Our reception is just for adults, but children are welcome at the wedding.

Other Ways to Soften the Blow

One thing to consider is out-of-town guests with children. It’s not like they can leave the kids in a hotel room alone. And they can’t possibly find a sitter on their own when they live out of town. Consider vetting a sitter – or having older teens who are part of the family – provide reliable child care while mom and dad go to the wedding or reception. They might actually enjoy the break! If you’d like to discuss setting up a kid-free event, please contact us at Unique Events.

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